Thursday , July 2 2020

The story of how Nintendo’s iconic logo escaped an “age-up” remake, Ars Technica

    

      Now you’re playing with Reggie power –

             

The classic oval could have changed to “a graffiti style” or something “aged up.”

      

         

        

Enlarge / What might have happened to Nintendo’s iconic logo had executives such as Reggie Fils-Aimé not stepped in?
Aurich Lawson

Reggie FIls-Aimé, Nintendo of America’s popular former president, has begun making the rounds in interviews following his April retirement . And while he’s still speaking fondly of his former gaming employer, his post-retirement position appears to be letting him spill more beans about his years of leadership. This month, that includes a reveal of how he “put a stop” to at least one major change to the company: its logo.
Present Value , a podcast about business leadership recorded by Cornell University graduate students, interviewed Fils-Aimé on December of last year. That episode was resurfaced by gaming video channel GameXplain on Sunday due to the executive’s comment on the iconic, “racetrack” Nintendo logo, which has remained consistent since the company rise as an arcade and console game producer in the s.
The below comment from Fils-Aimé is transcribed from the December 50 episode:
When I joined Nintendo, there was a sense of almost shame that Nintendo appealed to young consumers. The marketing time at Nintendo of America started doing things with the logo. Right? That classic Nintendo logo in an oval. They would put it in a graffiti style, or they’d do different things to try and age up the logo. And I put a stop to that, because that is not our brand. What we needed to do was, yes, appeal to a broad swatch of consumers, but we needed to do it based on what the brand stood for, and not in some false way. Systemically, we went through and cleaned up the presentation of the brand. but we also created messaging, coupled with content, that really broadened the reach, broadened the appeal, and set the stage for all the great products we’d launch, like Wii, like Wii Fit, and eventually the Nintendo Switch.       

      

            

                              

                                      

                      Let’s go down memory lane for various ways the Roman Alphabet version of “Nintendo” has appeared. The company headquarters in Kyoto might have required a serious reworking if early – ‘ s staffers in America had campaigned successfully to make changes.                                                         
                                              Nintendo                                   

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                          For funsies, we went into the Wayback Machine and confirmed that this was the very first background image on the company American site in the mid – ‘ s. It did make for much of a looping image at the time, especially with the company name cropped for some reason.                                                         
                                                  Nintendo                                   
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                          Another “edgy” use of the word “Nintendo” in a console’s name.                                                         
                                                  Nintendo                                   
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                          All dual-screen Nintendo consoles include a play on the company name’s final “O,” which is arguably the most “extreme” alteration of the official name in any Nintendo product.                                                         
                                                  Nintendo                                   
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    The episode did otherwise describe any work by Nintendo’s logo or branding teams. Savvy Nintendo fans likely recall Nintendo’s attempts to “age up” its products and consoles through the ‘ s and early ‘
  • s before Fils-Aimé joined the company in late 2020, particularly its “Play It Loud” and “Who Are You” advertising campaigns. The latter went so far as to include a massive amount of graffiti-styled text.
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